Wednesday, May 29, 2019

Is Psychotherapy More Effective When Therapist Disclose Information Ess

Is Psychotherapy More Effective When Therapist Disclose Information About Themselves? In the world of psychology healer raise a top dog whether or not they should disclose personal schooling during psychotherapy. Several healers run through suggested that therapist self-discloser can drive home a positive imp consummation on treatment. From this view, self-discloser by the therapists may elicit greater discloser by the client enhancing the possibilities for client self-exploration(e.g., Bugental, 1965, chap. 7 Jourad, 1971, chap. 17 Strassberg, Roback, DAntonio & Gable, 1977). In addition, self-discloser is thought to encourage an atmosphere of honesty and instinct between client and therapist, fostering a stronger and more effective therapeutic relationship). However many other therapist disagrees with that statement. They reply psychodynamic theorist since Freud have generally regarded therapist self-disclosure as detrimental to treatment because it might interfere with t he therapeutic process, shifting the focus of therapy away from the client(e.g., canvas cutis, 1982b Freud, 1912/1958 Greenson, 1967, chap. 3). In addition, it is argued that therapist self-discloser may adversely affect treatment outcome by exposing therapist weakness or vulnerabilities, thitherby undermining client trust in the therapist(e.g., see cutis, 1982b, 1981)According to the journal These differences in identifying therapist self-disclosures may be of importance in the evaluation of their impact on treatment. For example, theoretical concerns about therapist self-discloser have emphasized the risk of shifting the focus of therapy away from the client. However when therapist self-disclose, are in direct response to comparable client disclosers the presumed risk of watchfulness the focus of treatment is likely to reduced. The study clientsThere are a total of 36 clients that participated in the study, 15 being men and 21 being women. All of the clients requested therapy an d also the clients are over the age of 18. Exclude from the study were clients exhibiting sings of psychotic behavior, disoriented thinking, or neurological impairment. The repute age of the clients is 27, the range 18-42. The client presenting problem included issues such as depression, social or performance anxiety, relationship conflicts or lack of impulse control. none of the client where ... ...erapist self-discloser may adversely affect treatment outcome by exposing therapist weakness or vulnerabilities, thereby undermining client trust in the therapist(e.g., see cutis, 1982b, 1981).In reading this study, the main aspect I realize was none of the clients had any sever problem. This might have been one of the reason why the study came out so positive. If a therapist disclose personal information to a client without a sever problem, I line up there could be a good chance of a positive outcome. However, I feel that if a client has a sever problem this act should not take place because the therapist is now shifting the focus of therapy away from the client(e.g., see cutis, 1982b Freud, 1912/1958 Greenson, 1967, chap. 3) and that it self is damaging the client. In summation I feel that this study is true to a certain point what was not put to study was the levels of problem the clients were facing and to determine the level of improvement. I feel that this act should only take place when clients have minor problem and not major problem. In addition, if a therapist decided to disclose personal information it should be in the interest of the client and not the therapist

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